Port Haney Multi-Use Pathway (MUP)

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We’re building a new riverfront Multi-Use Pathway in Port Haney, extending from Port Haney Wharf to Kanaka Creek Regional Park.

In 2021, the City of Maple Ridge acquired a 5-acre parcel along the Fraser River. This linear property, formerly a log sort area, is bounded by the CP Rail tracks and Haney Bypass to the north, and the Fraser River to the south. The initial phase of this multi-use pathway aims to transform this area into a public space.

The pathway alignment is part of the “Experience the Fraser” route, a project developed by Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley Regional District, and their federation municipalities in 2010. The goal is to create a network of multi-modal trails developed along the Fraser River, stretching from the Salish Sea to Hope.

The project builds on this vision, enhancing access to the Fraser River and providing a new active transportation route along the waterfront.

What We Learned (October 2023) - Public Survey 1 Summary Infographic:

Community Engagement Phase #1 - Completed

We invited your feedback during the phase 1 community engagement from October 9th, to 30th, 2023.

There are a few ways to share your feedback during Community Engagement Phase #1

  1. Review the open house information board materials
  2. Complete the Survey by October 29th at 11:59 PM
  3. Share your "Big Idea" for the next phase of this park development
  4. Attend Open House on October 19th from 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM (drop-in) at the Maple Ridge Leisure Centre,

Your feedback will help us shape the design for the Port Haney Multi-Use Pathway!


Background

Multi-use pathways refer to dedicated routes or corridors that are designed to accommodate various modes of non-motorized transportation and recreational activities. These pathways are typically separate from roadways, providing a safe and accessible environment for pedestrians, cyclists, runners, rollerbladers, and sometimes even equestrians.

Some of the key benefits of multi-use pathways include:

  1. Enhanced Mobility: Multi-use pathways encourage active transportation, offering a convenient and environmentally friendly means of getting around the city. They provide an alternative to driving, reducing congestion and carbon emissions.
  2. Safety: By separating non-motorized users from vehicular traffic, multi-use pathways significantly enhance safety for pedestrians and cyclists, reducing the risk of accidents and injuries.
  3. Recreation and Wellness: These pathways promote physical activity and outdoor recreation, contributing to the health and well-being of residents. They offer opportunities for walking, jogging, cycling, and other forms of exercise.
  4. Connectivity: Multi-use pathways often link key destinations within a municipality, such as parks, schools, shopping areas, and transit hubs, making it easier for people to reach these places without a car.
  5. Community Building: These pathways create communal spaces where residents can interact, fostering a sense of community. They may also serve as venues for events and social gatherings.
  6. Tourism and Economic Benefits: Multi-use pathways can attract tourists, who come to explore a city's scenic routes and cultural landmarks. This influx of visitors can boost local businesses and tourism-related revenue.
  7. Environmental Impact: Encouraging non-motorized transportation reduces the carbon footprint of a municipality, contributing to environmental sustainability and air quality improvement.
  8. Accessibility: Multi-use pathways are designed to be inclusive, providing accessible routes for individuals with diverse abilities, strollers, and mobility aids, ensuring that everyone can enjoy the outdoors.

Level of Engagement - Involve

The engagement for this project is at the "involve" level of the International Association for Public Participation's (IAP2) Spectrum of Public Participation. This means that we will work with you (the public) to ensure that your concerns and aspirations are directly reflected in the project. We will also provide feedback on how public input influenced the decision.

Learn more about how we use the Spectrum as a foundation for community engagement here!

Translations

There is an automatic translation tool available at the top-right of this page. Languages include: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文], Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語], Spanish [Español] and more.

Please Note: Google Translate is a third-party service and we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of the translated content. If you require additional support, email engage@mapleridge.ca.

We’re building a new riverfront Multi-Use Pathway in Port Haney, extending from Port Haney Wharf to Kanaka Creek Regional Park.

In 2021, the City of Maple Ridge acquired a 5-acre parcel along the Fraser River. This linear property, formerly a log sort area, is bounded by the CP Rail tracks and Haney Bypass to the north, and the Fraser River to the south. The initial phase of this multi-use pathway aims to transform this area into a public space.

The pathway alignment is part of the “Experience the Fraser” route, a project developed by Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley Regional District, and their federation municipalities in 2010. The goal is to create a network of multi-modal trails developed along the Fraser River, stretching from the Salish Sea to Hope.

The project builds on this vision, enhancing access to the Fraser River and providing a new active transportation route along the waterfront.

What We Learned (October 2023) - Public Survey 1 Summary Infographic:

Community Engagement Phase #1 - Completed

We invited your feedback during the phase 1 community engagement from October 9th, to 30th, 2023.

There are a few ways to share your feedback during Community Engagement Phase #1

  1. Review the open house information board materials
  2. Complete the Survey by October 29th at 11:59 PM
  3. Share your "Big Idea" for the next phase of this park development
  4. Attend Open House on October 19th from 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM (drop-in) at the Maple Ridge Leisure Centre,

Your feedback will help us shape the design for the Port Haney Multi-Use Pathway!


Background

Multi-use pathways refer to dedicated routes or corridors that are designed to accommodate various modes of non-motorized transportation and recreational activities. These pathways are typically separate from roadways, providing a safe and accessible environment for pedestrians, cyclists, runners, rollerbladers, and sometimes even equestrians.

Some of the key benefits of multi-use pathways include:

  1. Enhanced Mobility: Multi-use pathways encourage active transportation, offering a convenient and environmentally friendly means of getting around the city. They provide an alternative to driving, reducing congestion and carbon emissions.
  2. Safety: By separating non-motorized users from vehicular traffic, multi-use pathways significantly enhance safety for pedestrians and cyclists, reducing the risk of accidents and injuries.
  3. Recreation and Wellness: These pathways promote physical activity and outdoor recreation, contributing to the health and well-being of residents. They offer opportunities for walking, jogging, cycling, and other forms of exercise.
  4. Connectivity: Multi-use pathways often link key destinations within a municipality, such as parks, schools, shopping areas, and transit hubs, making it easier for people to reach these places without a car.
  5. Community Building: These pathways create communal spaces where residents can interact, fostering a sense of community. They may also serve as venues for events and social gatherings.
  6. Tourism and Economic Benefits: Multi-use pathways can attract tourists, who come to explore a city's scenic routes and cultural landmarks. This influx of visitors can boost local businesses and tourism-related revenue.
  7. Environmental Impact: Encouraging non-motorized transportation reduces the carbon footprint of a municipality, contributing to environmental sustainability and air quality improvement.
  8. Accessibility: Multi-use pathways are designed to be inclusive, providing accessible routes for individuals with diverse abilities, strollers, and mobility aids, ensuring that everyone can enjoy the outdoors.

Level of Engagement - Involve

The engagement for this project is at the "involve" level of the International Association for Public Participation's (IAP2) Spectrum of Public Participation. This means that we will work with you (the public) to ensure that your concerns and aspirations are directly reflected in the project. We will also provide feedback on how public input influenced the decision.

Learn more about how we use the Spectrum as a foundation for community engagement here!

Translations

There is an automatic translation tool available at the top-right of this page. Languages include: Traditional Chinese [繁體中文], Simplified Chinese [简体中文] Punjabi [ਪੰਜਾਬੀ], Filipino [Tagalog], Vietnamese [Tiếng Việt], French [Français], Korean [한국어], Japanese [日本語], Spanish [Español] and more.

Please Note: Google Translate is a third-party service and we cannot guarantee the quality or accuracy of the translated content. If you require additional support, email engage@mapleridge.ca.

Page last updated: 05 Jan 2024, 10:22 AM